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Sinsinawa Mound Center offers retreats and programs as well as opportunities for personal reflection and renewal in a comfortable, rural setting.

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January 2020

Memory Cafe

January 30, 2020 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

A Memory Café is a social gathering place where people with memory loss, mild cognitive impairment, early Alzheimer's or other dementias can come together. Family and friends are also encouraged to join! In this relaxed environment, participants can visit, share common interests, and enjoy refreshments. A unique program or activity is offered each month.

Perfectly Imperfect

January 31, 2020 7:30 pm - February 2, 2020 1:00 pm

Progress in our spiritual journey is not about achieving perfection. Rather it invites us to inquire openly and with compassion about finding how the divine expresses in our daily lives. We often miss opportunities to deepen our spiritual growth by ignoring how our imperfections are actually the grist for the mill. Our imperfections are actually what we need to embrace in order to become free from old fears, doubts and self-doubts. Spiritual progress occurs only when we soften our self-aversion and begin to accept and relate wisely with deep compassion to what we judge to be imperfect.

February 2020

Come learn Native People's histories of the land that is Sinsinawa Mound. We'll draw from the Mascouten, Ho-Chunk, Potawatomi, and Meskwaki Nations. Dr. Eugene Tesdahl, assistant professor of history at UW-Platteville will lead this presentation. His recent work explores early indigenous and African American histories of the Driftless Region of Wisconsin.

Memory Cafe

February 27, 2020 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

A Memory Café is a social gathering place where people with memory loss, mild cognitive impairment, early Alzheimer's or other dementias can come together. Family and friends are also encouraged to join! In this relaxed environment, participants can visit, share common interests, and enjoy refreshments. A unique program or activity is offered each month.

June 2020

Tonight we celebrate the longest day of the year and the extravagance of light. This day also coincides with the feast of the nativity of St. John the Baptist. This outdoor, ecumenical gathering is centered on  honoring the sacred cycles of the year and situating ourselves within the wider community of Creation. You will need to register as we will be limited to 10 people.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, this large gathering has been cancelled.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, this large gathering has been cancelled.

July 2020

An Interview with Christopher Hill, author of Holidays and Holy Nights and Into the Mystic.

For many people the chaos of fifty-hour workweeks and the demands of family have created a hectic, routine-driven life. Time itself becomes a conveyor belt moving us contnuously from one demand to the next and year-to-year.

Wild Edibles Walk – CANCELLED

July 11, 2020 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Andy Benson will lead a wild edibles and naturalist walk through Sinsinawa Mound. He’ll cover recipes, personal edible favorites, how to spot edibles, and more! This program is currently full. If you would like to be put on a waiting list, please call 608-748-4411, ext. 811.

WEBINAR – Black Land Matters (FULL)

July 15, 2020 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

At this crucial racial moment, let's discuss the connections between racism, land, food, black-led agrarian projects, and possibilities for reparations.

.Join us for a discussion of the 2001 novel on place, memory, and agriculture that’s been hailed as a "masterpiece," "stunning," and "a sublime meditation on how irrevocable loss is redeemd through a renewed sense of kinship with the land and the past."

August 2020

Corn

An Interview with Paula Palmer and Jerilyn DeCoteau (Turtle Mountain Chippewa)

Join us for this hour-long interview to learn about building relationships among Native and non-Native communities based on truth, respect, justice and our shared humanity

WEBINAR – Ecology of Silence

August 26, 2020 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Our lives are too often caught up in the distractions of noise and busyness. This retreat will explore the role of silence and noise in our lives and our society. We'll look to silence as a way to re-connect with Creation and the Divine.

September 2020

Backyard Herbalism (via Zoom)

September 2, 2020 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Learn to identify and use nature's gifts in our own backyards. This short course will provide a brief overview of the medicinal properties of 10 native midwest plant species. Learn how to turn your "weeds" into medicine.

Canvas Painting: Happy Fall

September 15, 2020 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Sarah Barnes, artist and owner of Create It Art Studio in Dubuque, Iowa will guide you step-by-step in how to paint on canvas. All supplies will be provided. Bring along your friends for an enjoyable and creative evening out! Space will be limited to 10 people with one person at a table.

October 2020

The National Book Award finalist by the masterful Ojibwe storyteller has been described as "profoundly moving" and "nothing less than dazzling."
This discussion will cover roughly the first half the book. The discussion is free but registration is required.

Canvas Painting: Winter Barn

October 13, 2020 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Sarah Barnes, artist and owner of Create It Art Studio in Dubuque, Iowa will guide you step-by-step in how to paint on canvas. All supplies will be provided. Bring along your friends for an enjoyable and creative evening out! Space will be limited to 10 people with one person at a table.

Poetry of the Land (via Zoom)

October 14, 2020 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

John Keats wrote that "the poetry of earth is never dead," and, indeed, from the Georgics of Virgil, with its sections on animal husbandry and beekeeping, to more contemporary poems by poets like Wendell Berry and Maurice Manning, the land has always been a fertile subject for poets to celebrate and mourn. In this webinar, we'll read and consider a few poems of the land.

Over the centuries there have been many misunderstandings about Mary Magdalene. Who was she really? What was her role in the early Church? What does she have to say to us today?

Walking the Sacred Path with Dan Schutte (virtual retreat)

October 19, 2020 12:00 am - October 22, 2020 8:00 pm

This is a recorded two day retreat presented by Dan Schutte. The retreat will be followed up with a live zoom Q & A meeting with Dan on Thursday, October 22 from 7-8 p.m CST. Each day's presentation is approximately 1 - 1 1/2 hours with reflections and music. A digital workbook/prayer journal is included. The two days can viewed anytime between October 19 and prior to the zoom meeting on October 22.

This National Book Award finalist by the masterful Ojibwe storyteller has been described as "profoundly moving" and "nothing less than dazzling." This discussion will cover roughly the last half of the book. The discussion is free but registration is required.

"As rural Wisconsin's fortunes declined, its political importance has grown," writes journalist Dan Kaufman in a recent national article on the importance of Wisconsin ahead of the 2020 election. In this far-reaching interview with Curt Meine (environmental historian; co-editor, Driftless Reader) we will delve into the political importance of rural Wisconsin, the realities of America's urban-rural divide, the transformation and challenges of today's agriculture, and more.

November 2020

Like the seasons of the Earth that shift and change in nature, our lives of faith are also cyclical and invite us to "pause," breathe into and appreciate the season. This is the first of our four session virtual micro-retreat that will invite participants to be attentive, compassionate,  pause and appreciate each faith based "season" as it mirrors the natural changing cycle of seasons.

In this interview with Mohican storyteller, Jim Bear Jacobs, we'll learn about the connection between story and place, be challenged by Native American spirituality, and learn what non-native people can do to decolonize.

This presentation is designed to open minds and hearts in new ways, to provoke thought by challenging our cultural conditioning about a difficult topic that touches many of us, and to offer hope and consolation to those who accompany loved ones through the journey of diminishing cognitive capacities that are the hallmark of Alzheimer's and other diseases of dementia.

Today St. Hildegard is known especially for her visions and lyrics concerning the feminine Divine and her prescient ecological awareness. After a short introduction, this webinar will focus on her visions of divine Love (Caritas) and Lady Wisdom. It will also explore her urgent prophetic message about cosmology, ecological balance, and the effects of human sinfulness on the environment.

Canvas Painting: Skating Snowperson

November 17, 2020 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

THIS CLASS IS FULL. SAME CLASS WILL BE HELD AGAIN ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1. IF INTERESTED, SCROLL DOWN TO DECEMBER 1 TO REGISTER.

It is painfully evident that the life support systems of planet Earth are in crisis. The web of life for all species, including humans, is in peril.  Buddhist teachings and Deep Ecology agree that we humans will not change the behaviors causing such suffering unless we transform the sense of our  identity.

December 2020

You must have attended the Buddhist Teachings (Part One) on November 18th to register for this event.
Those who choose to participate in the Council of All Beings enter the experience to personally deepen the teachings offered in Part One, “Buddhist Teachings for Deep Ecology.”  This ritual invites you to step beyond your human self and assume the identity of another member of the Earth community.

This live stream ecumenical service will be held to honor family and friends who have died. We are planning to honor our deceased loved ones by displaying a personalized ornament on a tree. This live-streamed service is a living memorial and provides an opportunity for you and your family to experience a new and meaningful ritual.

Like the seasons of the Earth that shift and change in nature, our lives of faith are also cyclical and invite us to "pause," breathe into and appreciate the season. This is the second of our four session virtual micro-retreat that will invite participants to be attentive, compassionate,  pause and appreciate each faith based "season" as it mirrors the natural changing cycle of seasons.

Join us to  honor the longest and shortest day of the year. We'll share reflections, poetry, and song for this special night. This online event will be facilitated by Eric Anglada.

January 2021

In our dark and precarious times, let’s delve into the poetry and prose of Kentucky farmer, Wendell Berry (1934-). Berry is arguably today’s most lyrical, passionate, and important prophet writing today. We’ll explore his life and explorations on land, race, spirituality, health and crisis.

The practice of meditation has become so popularized that it  promises to offer some desired outcome. A kind of commodity we purchase for a particular purpose. When, in fact, the practice of meditation is a way of being in our lives with less fear and greater compassion.

Into the Silence (via Zoom)

January 13 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Let's delve into the richness and importance of silence in this great, slow, dark, and quiet time of the year. We'll explore the role of silence and noise in our spiritual lives and with the wider community of Creation.

Weaving together science specific to Alzheimer's disease, spirituality, and the artful practice of improvisation, this introductory workshop/presentation offers caregivers an experience that is informative, inspiring, empowering, and engaging. Participants will learn the most important technique for communicating with persons living with Alzheimer's or dementia: Accepting what is.

In light of the challenges of our times, it is worthwhile to look back to another extremely challenging time and hear the voices of those who found meaning in their suffering. We will be looking at the lives and words of women like Edith Stein, Anne Frank, Etty Hillesum, and Corrie Ten Boom

Julian of Norwich, a fourteenth century woman recluse, has become increasingly popular in recent years because her ideas about the pervasive meaning of God’s love seem especially pertinent and needed here in the twenty-first century.  A famous and significant part of her teaching was her assertion, repeated often in her “Showings,” that God is our Mother, that Jesus is our Mother.

The tri-state region of Southwest Wisconsin, Northwest Illinois, and Eastern Iowa occupies the ancestral lands of the Sauk, Meskwaki, Potawatomi, and Ho-Chunk nations. The United States acquired this mineral-rich region in a series of treaties with Indigenous nations signed from 1804 to 1832.

February 2021

This program is FULL.
Mondays, February 1, 8, 15, 22, March 1, 8, 15 22 - 6-8 p.m.
Mound is offering the new online JustFaith series “Sacred Land: Food and Farming.” This first program in JustFaith Ministries’ Eco-justice Series explores our connection with the land and our responsibility for it. Together our small group will learn how food and farming practices affect the climate crisis, marginalized communities, and our own health and spiritual wellbeing.

National Book Award finalist. Melds history with reportage and memoir. "It's hard to imagine there will be a better, more compelling look at Indian country than this one anytime soon." (The Daily Beast). 450 pages.

Virtual Lenten Retreat with Dan Schutte

February 17 8:00 am - April 1 4:00 pm

Lent is often a time for parishes to make a retreat or parish mission. This program of eighteen music reflection videos by Dan Schutte provides a way to do that virtually. The video series will be accessible beginning on Ash Wednesday and end on Holy Thursday as we begin the Triduum Liturgies.

We share this beautiful blue-green globe with creatures magnificent, delicate, intricate—and now vanishing at a faster rate than at any other time in Earth’s history. Begin Lent with us as Gayle shares their stories--stories of the suffering of God's Beauty.

From the start of pandemic time, as we continue to travel through the uncertainty of “covid-liminality,” until we anticipate the promise of hope, we are invited to pause and consider how the seasons of faith (Ordinary time, Advent, Lent, Easter) require an attitude and practice of compassion beginning with fostering individual self-compassion and embracing the reality of our shared suffering with humanity during this unprecedented time.

March 2021

Please join Dr. Evan Larson and Dr. Chris Underwood as they share stories, photographs, and scientific results from a decade of tree-ring research conducted in collaboration with their students at UW-Platteville and at sites across the Driftless Area.

Effigy Mounds National Monument contains more than 200 earth mounds, the highest concentration of mounds in the world, some as old as 2500 years. In this interview, Barland-Liles will discuss the magic of the effigy mounds, the history of the land, the Native American Graves and Repatriation Act, his building relationships with Native Nations, and the investigation he led into a much-publicized federal crime that happened on site.

THIS PROGRAM IS FULL.
William “Naawacekgize” Quackenbush, member of the Deer Clan and Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, will speak about the continual presence of the Ho-Chunk in the Driftless Area.

 Despite the Northwest Ordinance’s 1787 prohibition of slavery and involuntary servitude, African American and African French people labored in bondage in the Wisconsin-Illinois lead district for white masters and mistresses. Why did the diggings become a center of slavery and quasi-slavery, and how did that work transform the area?

This presentation will focus on practical implementation in production systems that benefit both the farmer and the land: cover crops, variable rate technology, and extended rotation. Rooted in scientific principles published through the NRCS, we’ll discuss strategies that  help bridge the gap between technical applications and practices in the field. Adam Kramer will be joined by area farmers.

April 2021

Join us for a presentation by EcoWomanist theologian and practitioner Veronica Kyle who will explore the intersections of ecospirituality, environmental stewardship, racial justice, womanist theology, and movement-building.

From the start of pandemic time, as we continue to travel through the uncertainty of “covid-liminality,” until we anticipate the promise of hope, we are invited to pause and consider how the seasons of faith (Ordinary time, Advent, Lent, Easter) require an attitude and practice of compassion beginning with fostering  individual self-compassion and embracing the reality of our shared suffering with humanity during this unprecedented time.

Winner of the John Burroughs Medal Award for Natural History Writing. “This is so much more than a book about mosses. This is a Native American woman speaking. This is a mother's story. This is science revealed through the human psyche. Hers is a spectacularly different view of the world, and her true voice needs to be heard” (Janisse Ray).

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Sinsinawa Mound Center

585 County Road Z
Sinsinawa, WI 53824
608-748-4411

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