Dominican Vision January 2018 Index

Dominican Vision magazine cover January 2018. Immigration. What's Your Story?
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On the Cover (see above)

Sister Quincy Howard, OP, stands at the border wall in Texas.
Photo by Sr. Rhonda Miska.

Citizens of God’s Household
“So you are no longer aliens or foreign visitors; you are fellow citizens with the holy people of God and part of God’s household.” (Ephesians 2:19)

God’s household—our human family—now has more people who are displaced from their homelands than ever before. Nearly 66 million people are uprooted from home. Many of these people emigrate from all that is familiar because they are desperate for a secure life that is not possible in their countries of origin. Read more . . .

Journeys of Hope and Pain

Immigration is a hot topic these days. In this issue of Dominican Vision, we offer you a selection of stories of our own Sisters who are immigrants and refugees. Read more . . .

Immigrants’ Desires Remain

“Wake up! We need to go out on deck and see the Statue of Liberty.” Those were my father’s words March 5, 1952, as our ship, Queen Elizabeth II, was getting close to the New York harbor. It was important to my parents that we see this symbol that welcomes “your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” Read more . . .

Fleeing Communist Cuba

“I am a refugee, not an immigrant,” stated Sister Ana Luisa Cespedes, OP. When Fidel Castro became prime minister of Cuba in 1959, Sr. Ana Luisa never imagined that two years later she would leave her home country as a refugee. “I was very happy in my country. I was raised in Cuba. My family and friends were there. Read more . . .

The Spoils of War

My grandparents, Emil and Grete Juska, emigrated from Germany in 1917 and settled in Kenosha, WI. My mother, Marion, was born, July 13, 1919. Two months later, my grandfather died when his car stalled on railroad tracks. Within a year, my grandmother returned to Berlin with her infant daughter who grew up in Germany. Read more . . .

The Path to Citizenship

I came to the United States in 1963 with a student visa. I had no trouble with the immigration and was able to go to school. After joining the Dominican Sisters of Sinsinawa, WI, and graduating from college, January 1969, I was sent as a missionary to my native Bolivia. Read more . . .

Going to the ‘Ends of the Earth’

As a teenager, I decided I wanted to be a nun. The Catholic church in my hometown, Nakusp, British Columbia (BC), Canada, carried Our Sunday Visitor. Once a year, convents advertised in the Visitor inviting women to join them. I wrote to every congregation, eventually settling on the Dominicans of Kenosha, WI. Read more . . .

From ‘Foreigner’ to Naturalized Citizen

“Look, children, there is our new country!” My mother had brought me and my three sisters up to the deck of the Italian liner, Ultomia, after 29 days at sea. We saw the glittering lights in New York harbor and thought it was fairyland. Read more . . .

our Sisters as Immigrants - Map

Map of the world illustrating the countries our Sisters came from. Read more . . .

Wisdom from Father Samuel

“When the last farewells were over, he left his native land with little probability of ever seeing it again, and yet without a sorrowful heart. In truth we have no lasting country on Earth; a Christian’s own country is there where God calls him; so, for the man called to apostolic ministry, the act of leaving his birthplace to go into missionary lands was rather a setting out in search of his real country." Read more . . .

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